LT4: Food Safety

Long-term indicators inform whether SNAP-Ed participants continue to demonstrate targeted behavioral changes even after graduating from a direct education program. LT1–LT4 indicators measure which behaviors are sustained at a minimum of 6 months post-intervention. The maintenance stage of the Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model lasts from 6 months to 5 years.

LT3: Physical Activity and Reduced Sedentary Behavior

Long-term indicators inform whether SNAP-Ed participants continue to demonstrate targeted behavioral changes even after graduating from a direct education program. LT1–LT4 indicators measure which behaviors are sustained at a minimum of 6 months post-intervention. The maintenance stage of the Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model lasts from 6 months to 5 years.

As LT3 measures which behavioral changes to increase physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behavior are sustained at a minimum of 6 months post-intervention, SNAP-Ed agencies should use the same survey and data collection tools used in MT3 to measure the extent to which physical activity is increased and sedentary behavior is decreased.

LT2: Food Resource Management

Long-term indicators inform whether SNAP-Ed participants continue to demonstrate targeted behavioral changes even after graduating from a direct education program. LT1–LT4 indicators measure which behaviors are sustained at a minimum of 6 months post-intervention. The maintenance stage of the Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model lasts from 6 months to 5 years.

As LT2 assesses the maintenance (6 months or longer) of behavior changes resulting from smarter shopping and food resource management (FRM) strategies, SNAP-Ed agencies should use the same survey and data collection tools used in MT2 to assess behavior change before and after participation in a series of nutrition education and food resource management classes.

LT1: Healthy Eating

Long-term indicators inform whether SNAP-Ed participants continue to demonstrate targeted behavioral changes even after graduating from a direct education program. LT1–LT4 indicators measure which behaviors are sustained at a minimum of 6 months post-intervention. The maintenance stage of the Transtheoretical (Stages of Change) Model lasts from 6 months to 5 years.

As LT1 measures which adopted healthy eating behaviors are sustained at a minimum of 6 months post-intervention, SNAP-Ed agencies should use the same survey or data collection tools used in MT1 to measure the extent to which participants are improving their dietary patterns across food groups on the pathway toward achieving current Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendations.

MT4: Food Safety

Changes in individual and group behaviors that reflect MyPlate principles and are on the pathway to achieving the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendations.

MT3: Physical Activity and Reduced Sedentary Behavior*

Two-part indicator measuring behavioral changes to increase physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behavior. Physical activity is defined as any body movement that works muscles and requires more energy than resting. Sedentary behavior is defined as too much sitting or lying down at work, at home, in social settings, and during leisure time. Both increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behaviors is important for overall health.

*SNAP-Ed Priority Outcome Indicator

MT2: Food Resource Management*

Changes in individual and family behaviors that reflect smarter shopping and food resource management strategies, enabling participants to stretch their food resource dollars to support a healthier diet.

*SNAP-Ed Priority Outcome Indicator

ST4: Food Safety

Individual intention and goals that serve as motivators to food safety behavior changes recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

ST3: Physical Activity and Reduced Sedentary Behavior

Two-part indicator measuring intentions and goals to increase physical activity and/or reduce sedentary behavior.

Physical activity is defined as any body movement that works muscles and requires more energy than resting. Sedentary behavior is defined as too much sitting or lying down at work, at home, in social settings, and during leisure time. Both increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behaviors is important for overall health.