Adapting to COVID-19 Series: Adapting SNAP-Ed Programming to Remote Delivery

SNAP-Ed Toolkit and SNAP-Ed Connection:

This webinar and associated training materials are a part of a 3-part webinar series where state and local SNAP-Ed programs who were creating, innovating, and delivering SNAP-Ed remotely in the COVID-19 era presented. The other two parts in the series include Collecting and Reporting Data and Measuring and Evaluating Impact. This webinar and associated training materials was designed to share how SNAP-Ed programming was adapted for remote delivery. The webinar includes content, guidance, and lessons learned from the developers of Food eTalk, Cooking with Kids, and Text2LiveHealthy.

These webinars are pre-approved for 1.5 CPE credits (until July 28, 2023) for Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians, Registered by the Commission for Dietetic Registration.

Adapting to COVID-19 Series: Collecting and Reporting Data

SNAP-Ed Toolkit and SNAP-Ed Connection:

This webinar and associated training materials are a part of a 3-part webinar series where state and local SNAP-Ed programs who were creating, innovating, and delivering SNAP-Ed remotely in the COVID-19 era presented. The other two parts in the series include Adapting SNAP-Ed Programming to Remote Delivery and Measuring and Evaluating Impact. This webinar and associated training materials are designed to share how different SNAP-Ed programs (University of Missouri Extension, Kansas State University PEARS Team, Michigan Fitness Foundation) collected and reported data.

These webinars are pre-approved for 1.5 CPE credits (until July 28, 2023) for Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians, Registered by the Commission for Dietetic Registration.

Adapting to COVID-19 Series: Measuring and Evaluating Impact

SNAP-Ed Toolkit and SNAP-Ed Connection:

This webinar and associated training materials are a part of a 3-part webinar series where state and local SNAP-Ed programs who were creating, innovating, and delivering SNAP-Ed remotely in the COVID-19 era presented. The other two parts in the series include Adapting SNAP-Ed Programming to Remote Delivery and Collecting and Reporting Data. This webinar and associated training materials are designed to share how SNAP-Ed programming adapted for remote delivery was measured and evaluated. The webinar includes content, guidance, and lessons learned from the University of Georgia SNAP-Ed and the University of Minnesota Extension.

These webinars are pre-approved for 1.5 CPE credits (until July 28, 2023) for Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians, Registered by the Commission for Dietetic Registration.

Advancing Health Equity through SNAP-Ed Evaluation

Dr. Natalie Cook, PhD, Population Health Sciences at Virginia Tech:

This webinar was offered as an introduction to the concept of Transformative Evaluation (TE) and to offer suggestions on how to incorporate TE principles and practices into SNAP-Ed evaluation to contribute to efforts to increase health equity through SNAP-Ed programming. The webinar was provided by the Evaluation and Reporting subgroup of the ASNNA Evaluation Committee.

An Introduction to Policy, Systems, and Environmental Approach

Cornell University's Division of Nutritional Sciences:

This online course is designed to meet the needs of professionals working to increase access to healthy food and physical activity options for low-income individuals and families. It includes the first module of a more in-depth, six-module course entitled Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice and provides both an introduction for those new to policy, systems, and environmental approaches (PSEs) and an overview for those with more experience with PSEs.

This course is approved for 2.0 Hours for Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR).

Behavioral Economics in the Healthy Retail Environment: Working Within the SNAP-Ed Context

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

This training material is designed to introduce key concepts from behavioral economics and discuss how SNAP-Ed agencies can leverage these concepts to “nudge” consumers to make healthier food choices in a retail setting. Contributors include Alice Ammerman, Molly De Marco, and Daniella Uslan.

Best Practices – Childcare and School Wellness

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

This training material is designed to share best practices in childcare and school wellness. This material includes content, guidance, and lessons learned from California Project LEAN, HealthMPowers, and University of Florida IFAS Extension.

Connecticut Breastfeeding Initiative

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material are designed to provide an overview of the Connecticut Breastfeeding Intervention (CBI), describe how the intervention works, and discuss its public health impact. CBI was designed to promote practices in maternity facilities that support the initiation and continuation of breastfeeding. The cornerstone of the CBI is the implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, comprised of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding that focus on breastfeeding initiation, exclusive breastfeeding, skin-to-skin contact, rooming in and more. Contributors include Caroline Smith Cooke and Jennifer Matranga.

Eat Well, Be Well Project Manual

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP):

This training material includes a manual that provides a how-to and lessons learned for implementation of the Eat Well, Be Well Rural Healthy Corner Store Project. “Eat Well, Be Well” is a five-phase environmental intervention aimed to address obesity by increasing access to and purchasing of healthy food items in corner stores.

Evaluation Tools for SNAP-Ed Populations and Needs

SNAP-Ed Connection and Public Health Institute:

This webinar is designed to address the following objectives: understand how to find evaluation tools for SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework indicators; understand how to use evaluation tools for SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework indicators, and learn about some of the existing SNAP-Ed tools that are available for specific populations. Contributors include Sharon Sugerman and Jennifer Anderson.

Evidence-Based Public Health Evaluation: Evaluating the Program or Policy

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material are designed to provide an overview of evaluation for local health department staff. The main objectives of the webinar were to understand the basic components of program evaluation, describe the differences and unique contributions of quantitative and qualitative evaluation, understand the various types of study designs useful in program evaluation, describe concepts of measurement validity and reliability, identify some advantages and disadvantages of various types of data, and describe some of the steps involved in conducting qualitative evaluations. The presenter of the webinar is Jennifer Leeman.

Faithful Families Eating Smart and Moving More

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material are designed to provide an overview of Faithful Families Eating Smart and Moving More (FFESMM), describe how the intervention works, and discuss its public health impact. FFESMM is an intervention that focuses on healthy environmental and policy changes within faith communities. It also promotes healthy eating habits and increased physical activity through a series of group nutrition/physical activity education sessions. The presenter of the Annie Hardison-Moody.

Going Online: The nuts & bolts of providing SNAP-Ed programming virtually

Food, Fitness and Opportunity Research Collaborative (FFORC):

This webinar and associated training materials are designed to introduce SNAP-Ed Implementing Agencies to online platforms to deliver SNAP-Ed programming virtually. Key topics explored in the webinar include general resources for navigating technical aspects of going online, common online platforms (e.g., how to pick the best one for your work, how to get started), and best practices for planning for accessing needs. The presenter of the webinar is Julia Kimmel.

Health Bucks

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material are designed to provide an overview of Health Bucks, describe how the intervention works, and discuss its public health impact. Health Bucks are $2 coupons that can be used to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables at participating farmers markets. By providing a financial incentive that increases purchasing power, the Health Bucks program helps residents of low-income neighborhoods increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables. The presenter of the webinar is Sabrina Baronberg.

Healthy Change: Putting Local and State Food Policy to Work for Your Communities

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material is designed to describe the role of local and state food policy councils in promoting healthy and sustainable food systems. The webinar examines how food policy councils have engaged food system stakeholders and policy makers to increase access to healthy and affordable food, promote locally produced food and procurement, and reduce food insecurity. The presenter of the webinar is Mark Winne.

Healthy Food Pantry Assessment Toolkit

Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Center of Excellence – West (RNECE-W):

This webinar and training material are designed to describe how to complete the Healthy Food Pantry Assessment Tool. Training objectives include gaining familiarity with the assessment tool, increasing comfort in choosing response options, and practicing using the tool. Contributors to the webinar include Alexandra Bush-Kaufman and Marie Walsh. The toolkit was developed by members of the WSU-Extension Pierce County Office in partnership with researchers from Colorado State University-Extension as part of the Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Center of Excellence-West (RNECE-W).

How can human-centered design support SNAP-Ed reach and impact?

Food, Fitness and Opportunity Research Collaborative (FFORC) and Cooking Matters (CM):

This webinar is designed to share ideas for implementing and testing food retail strategies in your community. Learning objectives include defining design thinking and naming key design thinking mindsets and principles, explaining how design thinking can help move SNAP-Ed reach and impact forward, understanding how to move an idea or solution forward using prototyping and testing, and knowing where to go to find more information and continue learning. This webinar draws on learnings from the Using Human-Centered Design to Test Food Retail Strategies guide. Contributors include Megan Bradley, Claire Sadeghzadeh, Lindsey Guge, and Liz Chen.

Incorporating Farmers Markets and Community Gardens

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

This training material is designed to exchange creative interventions and evaluation results from various projects that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables through community gardens and farmers’ market interventions. Contributors include Meredith Ledlie-Johnson, Meredith Scott, Robert John, and Daniella Uslan.

Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice

Cornell University's Division of Nutritional Sciences:

This online course is designed to meet the needs of professionals working to increase access to healthy food and physical activity options for low-income individuals and families. It includes an in-depth six-module course that introduces the learner to policy, systems, and environmental approaches (PSEs) and uses an interactive workbook to guide the learner through designing their own PSE approach in their community.

This course is approved for 12.0 Hours for Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR).

Measurement of Policy, Systems, and Environmental Change in EFNEP and SNAP-Ed Programs

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

This training material is designed to provide an overview of PSE activities within the SNAP-Ed and Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) programs and how to evaluate those activities. Information on how to measure reach in PSE activities and examples from implementing agencies are provided. Contributors include Molly De Marco, Andy Naja-Riese, Lauren Whetstone, Alice Ammerman, Theresa LeGros, Pamela Bruno, Daniella Uslan, and Helen Chapman.

Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) Change in SNAP-Ed and Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) Programs

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

This training material is designed for implementers, evaluators, researchers, and partners of SNAP-Ed and EFNEP programs nationwide to provide a broad introduction to the guidance and training opportunities available to help programs get started with new PSE initiatives, improve current PSE implementation and evaluation efforts, and/or learn how current activities may already fit with PSE strategies. Contributors include Alice Ammerman, Lorelei Jones, Molly De Marco, and Stephanie Jilcott-Pitts.

Practical Policy Evaluation

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training materials are designed to describe a framework of evaluation developed by the Center for Training and Research Translation. The framework is intended to be simple enough to make its use feasible in practice-settings, yet thorough enough to provide acceptable evidence of the effect of the policy or environmental change intervention on targeted outcomes. The presenter of this webinar is Jennifer Leeman.

RE-AIM Training

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material are designed to provide instruction and case examples to illustrate the five dimensions of the RE-AIM framework: Reach, Effectiveness or efficacy, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance. The RE-AIM framework is useful for planning new interventions, adapting existing interventions, and designing evaluations that assess the potential public health impact of interventions. The module provides users with examples of real-life application to policy/environmental change interventions.

Riverside Unified School District (RUSD) Farmers Market Salad Bar Program

Center for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT):

This webinar and training material are designed to provide an overview of the Riverside Unified School District (RUSD) Farmers Market Salad Bar, describe how the intervention works, and discuss its public health impact. This initiative has demonstrated significant successes at providing greater access to fresh fruits and vegetables to public school children in 29 elementary schools, increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among those students who choose to eat from the salad bar, and creating positive relationships between school food service staff members and students, administrators, teachers and parents. The presenter of the webinar is Rodney K. Taylor.

Roadmap for SNAP-Ed Engagement in Early Childhood Education (ECE) Settings

Food, Fitness and Opportunity Research Collaborative (FFORC) and Cooking Matters (CM):

This training material is designed to guide SNAP-Ed Implementing Agencies through six steps to building meaningful, impactful relationships with stakeholders to ultimately engage parents and caregivers in health promotion strategies within the early childhood education setting that center their needs and desires. The Roadmap includes templates and tools for relationship building, collaborative goal settings, and celebrating and communicating successes with partners, parents and caregivers, and beyond. Contributors include the Food, Fitness and Research Collaborative (FFORC) and Cooking Matters.

SERO SNAP-Ed Best Practices: Measuring and Sustaining Policy, Systems and Environmental Changes

Public Health Institute’s Center for Wellness and Nutrition:

This webinar is designed to share best practices for measuring and sustaining policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change. The webinar includes content, guidance, and lessons learned from the Michigan Fitness Foundation, the California Department of Public Health & Nutrition Policy Institute, and the University of South Carolina.

SNAP-Ed and Disasters: Providing an Effective Response

SNAP-Ed Connection:

This webinar is designed to learn from two SNAP-Ed agency programs who have experienced disasters first-hand, and successfully met the needs of their community through the partnerships and community presence fostered by SNAP-Ed-funded projects. Additional information is provided by a USDA food safety expert who shared how you can prepare in advance for possible emergencies.

This webinar is pre-approved for 1 CPE credit (until May 13, 2022) for Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians, Registered by the Commission for Dietetic Registration.

SNAP-Ed and School Gardens: Growing Together

SNAP-Ed Connection:

This webinar is designed to discuss the benefits of gardening in SNAP-Ed programming/nutrition education. Information on how to assess needs, create partnerships, and start a school garden are shared. Additional information on how to maintain a school garden, successfully integrate nutrition education, and examples of how to evaluate a school garden are also shared. Contributors include Heather Buritsch, Nicole Walker, Lisa Lachenmayr, Laura Quynn, and Hannah Ruhl.

This webinar is pre-approved for 1 CPE credit (until August 28, 2022) for Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Technicians, Registered by the Commission for Dietetic Registration.

SNAP-Ed Policy, Systems and Environmental Integrative Map

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

 

 

This training material is designed to provide tools and resources to build skills for policy, systems and environmental approaches to support SNAP-Ed community initiatives to create healthy local places. Video modules feature current, successful approaches that are being implemented in community settings. Each setting provides details for implementation and evaluation based upon the evaluation framework metrics.

Strengthening Outcomes Through Collective Impact

UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP), RNECE-South:

This training material is designed to introduce the concepts and theories behind collective impact, and guest speakers discuss how it can be used by SNAP-Ed and Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) agencies to strengthen outcomes, especially in policies, systems, and environmental change. Contributors include Loralei Jones, Andy Naja-Riese, Abby Piner, and Julia Carboni.

Systems Approach for Healthy Communities

University of Minnesota Extension:

This online professional development program is designed to promote the integration of policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change approaches with educational strategies. The program is designed for organizations whose work focuses on health promotion to help staff understand, reflect, and act on the many factors that influence whether individuals can easily make healthy choices. The program integrates PSE changes with educational strategies in order for participants to develop the skills they need to impact policies, systems, and environments, as well as engage with partners and the community.

This program has been pre-approved for 5.0 hours of continuing education by The Commission on Dietetic Registration, The National Commission on Health Education Credentialing, and The National Board of Public Health Examiners.

The Role of Racial Equity in SNAP-Ed Part 1: Bringing Racial Equity into the Conversation

ASNNA Race, Health + Social Equity Committee, SNAP-Ed Toolkit Team, and SNAP-Ed Connection:

In this interactive, 75-minutes session, presenters discuss how SNAP-Ed activities can be implemented to advance racial equity by framing the issue of racial equity in SNAP-Ed, the directive from the USDA, the definition of racial equity, and how we can work to engage communities to advance racial equity. The presenters include Stacy Dean, the Deputy Under Secretary for USDA’s Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services, Dr. Mary Marczak, Director of Urban Family Development and Evaluation at the University of Minnesota Extension Center for Family Development, and Dr. Stephany Parker, Evaluation & Program Design Director of Oklahoma Tribal Engagement Partners (OKTEP).

For more information about the CEUs, including to receive a certificate of completion if you watch the recording, email snap-edconnection@usda.gov.

Using Human-Centered Design to Test and Implement Food Retail Interventions to Promote Healthy Food Choices Among Caregivers of Young Children

Food, Fitness and Opportunity Research Collaborative (FFORC) and Cooking Matters (CM):

 

This training material is designed to describe key insights and learnings from human-centered design workshops with SNAP-eligible parents and caregivers of young children (0 to 5 years) to learn about how SNAP-Ed could center their needs and desires when developing food retail interventions promoting healthy food choices. The guide provides two intervention frameworks prioritized by caregivers – a meal box intervention and a rewards program. The intervention frameworks were co-created with food retail stakeholders, SNAP-Ed Implementing Agencies, and caregivers using human-centered design methods. Guide developers include the Food, Fitness and Opportunity Research Collaborative (FFORC) and Cooking Matters.

To watch a training video on how to move these ideas into action, see https://snapedtoolkit.org/training/programs/how-can-human-centered-design-support-snap-ed-reach-and-impact/.

Writing SNAP-Ed Success Stories: Simple Strategies for Success

SNAP-Ed Connection:

This webinar is designed to learn from three SNAP-Ed agency program leaders with experience developing and sharing effective success stories share their methods and recommendations. Topics covered include tips and strategies for creating stories that are concise, powerful, and engaging to readers across the SNAP-Ed stakeholder community and the top 5 mistakes made when writing success stories (and how to avoid them). Contributors include Jennifer Anderson, Stephanie Cousins, Beth Peralta, and Pamela Bruno.